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Tous les jours c'est pas la même chose!

    

argaiv1161

SO, EVERYWHERE I GO IN THIS WORLD "CAJUN & CREOLE CULTURE" ARE MISUNDERSTOOD. SO, WHEN FOLKS ASK ME THE DIFFERENCES, I STICK TO THIS STORY. "Cedric Watson"

Cajun food and music is in no way Acadian. People up in Canada eat a lot of similar food to European French people. No, the Cajun food is mainly Creole. Let's be real. It's not what a normal French Canadian would cook. Very spicy food is not part of the French diet, but African.

Actually, the term "Creole" does not refer to a particular race of people and the majority of the people who call themselves "Cajuns" in Louisiana are not the descendants of folks from Nova Scotia.

The term "Creole" shows up in colonial documents of Louisiana as a way to distinguish the "locally born" from the foreign born, regardless of whether their parents were Africans or Europeans. If you were born anywhere in a French colony, you were described as a Creole.

And there is no difference culturally between Creoles and the so-called Cajuns. The only difference used to separate them is based on race only. But when you got to Louisiana, people will insist there is a difference, but can't explain how or why.

And as far as spices go, have you eaten gumbo from a Creole person vs. a Cajun? Who designated these distinctions? Visitors who have come from abroad to write on Louisiana people? Go sit down at a true Creole dinner table and you will find just as much difference in the spices used as you would from the next Creole household. The same thing with any Cajun household.

How is gumbo "overall Cajun"? Explain that please. The gravy that is used to make a gumbo (roux) is a cooking preparation that has been practiced, and still is practiced mind you, in France to this day. The ingredients: rice (West African in origin), the seafood, found locally here in Louisiana, filé, thickening sauce that is a contribution from Amérindiens. Not to mention that very similar dishes are found all throughout Latin-America and the Caribbean.

People are so fixated on Cajun that they want to label everything Cajun. If we are to assume that Cajun means "deriving from Acadie" then still, gumbo being "overall Cajun" is still debunked. None of those ingredients have come from Acadie.

Also, the Acadians descended theory is debunked. Genealogy research shows that a great percentage of those claiming to be Cajun based on Acadian ancestry have no Acadian ancestry at all. This thing is cultural. Let's stop trying to make it into a phony "racial" issue. Race isn't biologically even real.

Culturally, "Cajuns" are Louisiana Creoles, as they were native to the land. At one point, they even identified this way (all of what I'm saying by the way is well studied and documented; it's just buried deep inside libraries and scholastic files). Creoles and Cajuns both speak either French or Creole and in some cases both. The predominant religion is Catholic, both enjoy Zydeco and "Cajun" (once called "Old French" before the Cajun economic ploy) music.

Cajuns aren't the only people who are farmers and "self-sufficient" as it is thought. As a matter of fact, in the 18th and 19th centuries, contrary to popular belief, many Acadians acquired land, established businesses and purchased many slaves. Census records document this clearly and it debunks the theory that the Acadians were "simple country folk". Cajuns settled lands that were already inhabited by French-speaking Native Americans and Creoles and they lived among them and they learned from one another.

Prior to the 60's, people all identified as either Creoles or simply, Frenchmen. This Cajunness didn't come into play until Jimmie Domengeaux was appointed the Head of CODOFIL (Centre pour le developpement du Français en Louisiane) and because he was a self-identified Cajun, he would use this term to fuel economic efforts and generate funds into Louisiana under the label Cajun. 

NOW DATS REAL TALK!!! MERCI BEAUCOUPS WISE GEEK!!!